08 Oct 2014
ISF Advisors

This briefing is the sixth in a series by the Initiative for Smallholder Finance featuring an overview of how finance providers currently offer direct-to-farmer finance.

Globally, over 150 finance providers currently offer direct-to-farmer finance. These providers use a range of approaches to address core challenges associated with lending directly to these smallholders, but their lending activities still remain small in scale when compared to the vast demand for smallholder finance.

Closing this gap will require additional learning, knowledge sharing and blending of distinct approaches, and continued development and testing of innovative products and services.

 

23 Jun 2014
ISF Advisors

The fifth briefing note in a series from the Initiative for Smallholder Finance examines current lending practices among social lenders, considers the future trajectory of the sector, and highlights opportunities for investors and funders to support the sector’s future growth.

Drawing on a groundbreaking aggregate analysis of leading social lenders’ lending portfolios and metrics, this briefing note from the Initiative for Smallholder Finance examines current lending practices among social lenders, considers the future trajectory of the sector, and highlights opportunities for investors and funders to support the sector’s future growth.

Social lenders focus on addressing the significant smallholder agricultural finance gap by investing in small and growing agricultural businesses in low- and middle-income countries. In collaboration with technical assistance providers and global buyers, social lenders work to strengthen clients and allow them to access more finance and reach additional smallholder producers.

The social lending sector is an attractive opportunity for investors and funders to increase finance access for smallholder farmers and businesses that aggregate producers.

 

10 Jun 2014
ISF Advisors

The fourth briefing note in a series from the Initiative for Smallholder Finance reflects on the role of capital markets within the context of historical agricultural sector development.

Governments often directly shape the development of agricultural finance systems as they evolve. This research uses historical evidence from three advanced economies – Germany, the United States, and South Korea – to highlight policy considerations that will affect the growth of agricultural finance in today’s developing markets, where many of the world’s 450 million smallholder farmers live.

While there is no one-size-fits-all approach to agricultural finance policymaking, this analysis shows that systems have most effectively met agricultural sectors’ needs when governments carefully designed policies to enhance rather than replace credit provided to farmers by private actors.